World History

Turks and Caicos Islands | History, Capital, Language, Flag, Facts

History of Turks and Caicos Islands:

The Turks and Caicos Islands is a British territory in the Caribbean Sea. The first inhabitants were the Taino Indians. The first European to discover the island was Spanish explorer Juan Ponce de León in 1512. The Spaniards began capturing the local population on Hispaniola and using them as slaves.

The islands soon became deserted. Since the island was uninhabited, it served as a hiding place for pirates. It wasn’t until the 18th century that people began to settle on the island. In 1799 the islands became part of the British colony. They are still British territories.

Information about Turks and Caicos Islands:

Capital Grand Turk (Cockburn Town)
Population 46,115 (Source: 2023 worldometer)
Major Cities Grand Turk (Cockburn Town)
Borders southeast of Miami, Florida, south of the Bahamas and east of Cuba and the country of Hispaniola (Dominican Republic and Haiti)
Gross Domestic Product (GDP) $924,583,000 (2022 worldbankopedata)
Currency US dollar (USD)

Flag of Turks and Caicos Islands:

Turks and Caicos Islands Economy Key Industries:

Turks and Caicos Islands Major Industries: tourism, offshore financial services

Turks and Caicos Islands Agricultural Products: corn, beans, cassava (tapioca), citrus fruits; fish

Turks and Caicos Islands Natural Resources: spiny lobster, conch

Turks and Caicos Islands Major Exports: lobster, dried and fresh conch, conch shells

Turks and Caicos Islands Major Imports: food and beverages, tobacco, clothing, manufactures, construction materials

The Geography of Turks and Caicos Islands:

Total Size of Turks and Caicos Islands: 948 km² (source: 2022 The world factbook)

Geographical Low Point of Turks and Caicos Islands: Caribbean Sea 0 m

Geographical High Point of Turks and Caicos Islands: Blue Hills 49 m

Climate of Turks and Caicos Islands: Tropical; marine; moderated by trade winds; sunny and relatively dry

General Terrain of Turks and Caicos Islands: low, flat limestone; extensive marshes and mangrove swamps

World Region or Continent of Turks and Caicos Islands:  Central America

Geographical Coordinates: 21 45 N, 71 35 W

The People of Turks and Caicos Islands & Culture

Turks and Caicos Islands Government Type: NA

Turks and Caicos Islands Nationality: none

Turks and Caicos Islands National Holiday: Constitution Day, 30 August (1976)

Turks and Caicos Islands Independence: none (overseas territory of the UK)

Turks and Caicos Islands National Symbol:

Turks and Caicos Islands National Anthem or Song: This Land of Ours

Turks and Caicos Islands Languages Spoken: English (official)

Turks and Caicos Islands Religions: Baptist 40%, Anglican 18%, Methodist 16%, Church of God 12%, other 14% (1990)

Interesting Facts about Turks and Caicos Islands:

The Turks and Caicos Islands consist of about 40 islands with a combined area of ​​just 948 square miles. However, only eight of her islands are inhabited.

As the name suggests, the Turks and Caicos Islands are made up of her two separate islands. The Turks Seaway separates the Caicos Islands from the Turks Islands. This body of water is over 7,200 feet deep and is one of the reasons why diving in the Turks and Caicos Islands is great.

These islands have a long history of multiple governing bodies. Spain, France, and England ruled the Turks and Caicos Islands from the 16th to the 18th centuries. Eventually she decided in 1973 that these islands became British Overseas Territories, with Queen Elizabeth II as Head of State. In practice, however, the Queen appoints a governor-general to govern on the advice of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. However, you may be interested in the fact that in 1917 Canadian Prime Minister Robert Borden proposed that Canada acquire the Turks and Caicos Islands. The idea was opposed by British Prime Minister David Lloyd George, but the Turks and Caicos Islands have considered joining Canada three other times, in 1974, 2004 and 2014.

Like other islands in the region, the Turks and Caicos Islands have a history of piracy. A famous pirate named Calico Jack Rackham used this area as a hideout. His pirate lady Anne Bonny was also known to have lived on Pirate’s Cay.

The Turks and Caicos Islands are especially proud of their connection to water. In fact, two of his three items on the flag came from the sea. Conch shell and crayfish. But once upon a time, the flag of the Turks and Caicos Islands actually featured an igloo. This came from a misunderstanding. British flag makers mistook the island’s salt piles for igloos and added the symbol to their designs. It would have been appropriate to redesign the flag, but in practice this design remained in use for 100 years.

Divers will be especially pleased to learn that the Turks and Caicos Islands have the world’s third largest barrier he-reef he-he system. Of course, the system has some of the best diving spots in the world.

The waters around the Turks and Caicos Islands hold the oldest record of European shipwrecks excavated in the northern hemisphere. Archaeologists believe the shipwreck dates back to 1513 and was originally thought to be Christopher Columbus’ pinta, but they were wrong. The Molasses Reef wreck has yet to be identified, but artifacts from the ship can be viewed at the National Museum on Grand Turk.

From January to April each year, humpback whales pass through the Turks and Caicos Islands on their way from the Bay of Fundy in Canada to the Silver Banks near the Dominican Republic. A diver exploring the reefs of the Turks and Caicos Islands

The Turks and Caicos Islands have 330 miles of pristine white sand beaches. Additionally, the water temperature is perfect for swimming (or diving without a wetsuit). Temperatures range from 82°C to 84°C in summer and around 76°C in winter.

These islands are claimed to contain the world’s widest blue hole. Belize’s Great Blue Hole is believed by many to be the largest on earth, but it’s only half as wide as the Middle Caicos Ocean Hole.