Animals

12 Best Flowers for Valentine’s Day That Aren’t Red Roses

Valentine’s Day is coming up soon. Only Mother’s Day surpasses it as one of the busiest seasons for the floral industry. The enthusiasm and anticipation of a day dedicated to giving someone your heart is palpable in the flower shops. I’m a florist that can help you choose fresh flowers for that unique Valentine’s Day that go beyond the conventional red rose.

Valentine’s Day presents an opportunity to create personalised flower arrangements for each client, capturing the artistic singularity of their relationship and their day-to-day activities. Furthermore, red roses are, to be honest, uninspired, pricy, and environmentally harmful.

Any reputable florist will provide you with options that won’t break the bank, will still impress your sweetie, and add a personal touch. On every romantic date night, I’ll share with you a dozen flowers that can surpass a dozen red roses. In addition, I’ll let you in on an additional option. Discover the top 12 Valentine’s Day flowers that aren’t red roses by reading on!

Amaryllis (Hippeastrum)

The amaryllis is reserved for the stunning and daring! The blossoms lack the strong scent of lilies, yet they are shaped and sized similarly. As durable as a cut stem, they can be used alone in an arrangement to create a simple yet eye-catching design. Choose a colour like pink, a lovely orange-peach tone, or one of the unique green varieties to avoid looking like Christmas leftovers.

Anemone (Anemone)

The anemone, which is in style for Valentine’s Day, is a stunning species that should not be mistaken with the marine monster. Although the flower is also known by its common name, windflower, most florists will recognise it as an Anemone. This bloom possesses both versatility and beauty in equal measure, thanks to its wide spectrum of colours and black centre. Red anemones are longer-lasting and resemble poppies. Find out from your florist whether they can create a swoon-worthy deep, saturated effect by combining a variety of jewel-toned anemones with complementary blooms and foliage.

Mimosa (Acacia dealbata)

Look no further if you’re searching for a Valentine’s Day present that expresses, “You are my sunshine”! The mimosa species of blossoming Acacia is the ideal flower to add colour to a gloomy February date night. This plant blooms in the winter and has feathery foliage and beautiful beaded flowers. It smells sweet yet subdued too. Even though it’s uncommon, you might be able to give your florist a call in advance and ask them to place the order. You can enjoy the bright glow of a bouquet of mimosas in a vase for up to a week following your Valentine’s Day celebration if you bring some home.

Hydrangea (Hydrangea)

The big, pillowy form of the hydrangea creates a delicate, romantic statement for a warm Valentine’s Day evening. They are many different shapes and colours, one of which is blue, an uncommon colour naturally occurring in flowers. The flowers can function as the main attraction in a bouquet on their own or as a textural element in a blended arrangement. Whether you purchase from your neighbourhood grocery store or flower shop, hydrangeas are readily available.

Note that although hydrangeas make wonderful Valentine’s Day flowers, their name comes from the Greek word hydra, which means water and the water snake. Blooms usually wilt in a day or two if improperly conditioned. I advise you to adhere to these brief guidelines, particularly if you get your hydrangeas from a food store:

Make an angle cut in the stems.
Put the hydrangeas in water that is hot or boiling. The blooms will hydrate more quickly in the hot water.

In the event that your hydrangea does begin to wilt, you can use the same advice. Your hydrangea should reappear in a few hours!

A potted hydrangea from your neighbourhood nursery or garden centre would be a thoughtful Valentine’s Day gift for anyone who enjoys gardening. You’ll have the Valentine’s present that never stops blooming come spring and summer!

Gerbera Daisy (Gerbera)

Although gerbera daisies aren’t the most exquisite flowers, it’s difficult to find a more cheery bloom. The gerbera daisy is a readily available flower that comes in vivid shades of pink, yellow, and orange. With a true-blue friend or for a young daughter, it’s the ideal Valentine’s Day bouquet.

Tulip (Tulipa)

Are you still in search of a timeless item that isn’t a red rose? The tulip is the only place to look. Choose the romantic crimson or, for a more unique kind, search for the gorgeous double blooms or parrot tulips. It’s not necessary to go to Holland to discover an infinite variety of colours.

Simplify the arrangement by gathering several bunches of tulips in a vase or asking your florist to combine tulips with other flowers and foliage. Nothing could go wrong!

What’s more, which contributes to the tulip’s amazing bloom? It will keep growing even after you cut it! Savour a bouquet of flowers that will change over the next few days. As the tulips unfold, observe their elegant arcs and twists. The tulip is surprisingly widespread. Bring this early spring beauty home to demonstrate to your sweetie the power of tulips.

Hyacinth (Hyacinthus)

The powerful and distinctively floral aroma of hyacinth can cover an entire room if you’re seeking for a pleasant bouquet. You can select vivid hues of purple and fiery pink, or bring home a bouquet of gentle, pastel-colored hyacinths.

When Valentine’s Day rolls around, grocery stores and garden centres provide potted hyacinths, much like hydrangeas. Ask to have the spring bulb planted in a pretty pot with herbs or daffodils if your neighbourhood florist provides potted hyacinth so you can give your sweetie a fragrant dish garden.

Ranunculus (Ranunculus)

The ranunculus, sometimes misinterpreted as a little peony, is sure to please any Valentine! The round blossom, which belongs to the buttercup family, has tightly packed petals that gradually open up during the vase life. Add them to a more substantial arrangement of coordinating flowers and textures, or arrange a grouping of solitary stems in small flower vases that will look great by any bed.

Ranunculus is becoming more and more common in flower shops, but the delicate blush tint has become the standard for wedding flowers. Opt for a romantic, deep coral hue or a cool blend of peaches, yellows, and pinks for a delicious summer sorbet. Regardless of colour scheme, ranunculus exudes elegance and whimsicality while capturing the romance of the occasion!

Hellebore (Helleborus)

Hellebore is a winter flowering plant that makes a great cut stem or garden accent. Although it’s sometimes called a “lenten rose,” one look at its eye-catching bloom will make you want to tell those red roses to eat their hearts out.

The hellebore adds an artistic touch that is both seasonal and ageless to any floral arrangement, whether it is white, delicate pink, or dark, sombre burgundy. Request that your Valentine’s Day bouquet include hellebores from your florist. You’ll think you’re taking a live, breathing Dutch master painting home.

Orchid (Orchis)

Similar to tulips, orchids appear quite commonplace. Phalaenopsis, often known as moth orchids, are frequently found in supermarkets. But when picking up orchids for your Valentine, there’s more to it than meets the eye. It may surprise you to learn that there are more varieties of orchids than there are kinds of birds in the world.

Do this florist a favour and steer clear of the dyed or painted variants of the moth orchid, which come in a broad spectrum of gorgeous colours. Give your sweetheart a potted orchid to create a chic, contemporary look. This flower arrangement is good for a month! If not, your florist can still create a lovely cascading design by adding orchid stems. There may be more varieties of orchids available at certain floral shops that focus on tropical plants. Orchids such as Cymbidium, Dendrobium, and Vanda are excellent cut stem plants that have a wide range of vivid colours. Just one stem in a little bud vase can make just as much of an impact as grouping them with complementary flowers.

Iris (Iris)

Another early spring blooming is the iris. This blossom has an architectural, delicate quality that draws the eye in the same manner as your Valentine did. The blue-purple variety with little pops of bright yellow are the ones you’re most likely to find in flower stores. At first, they could appear like tight buds, but they will eventually reveal their beautiful forms. In a mixed arrangement with other coordinating flowers and colours, let them take the stage.

Icelandic Poppy (Papaver nudicaule)

The Icelandic poppy is the last substitute for red roses. Dreamy and delicate, this bloom might not persist as long as the others I mentioned. Their quirky beauty and brightness make them a worthy gift for your special someone, no matter how short-lived. Poppies are beautiful, bubbly, and fantastic teachers, with petals the consistency of tissue paper and cunning stalks that bend like dancers. They teach us the value of appreciating the good and lovely things in life, such as the love we have on Valentine’s Day.

Bonus: Designer’s Choice

Leaving it to the florist is a great bonus substitute for red roses. My best work is for customers who put their trust in me, since I have arranged innumerable bouquets and vase arrangements over the course of working many Valentine’s Days. If you allow the florist some artistic licence, your expectations will probably be surpassed. Getting the greatest quality flowers and even learning about some new flowers you had never seen before also involves keeping an open mind about what’s in season and what might be accessible nearby.

That does not imply that you have no voice at all. Customers who are not experienced with ordering flowers for Valentine’s Day should provide me with the following information:

Colour scheme: Please let me know which colour or colours you want in the bouquet (or which ones to stay away from).

A favourite flower: please let me know if you have any specific requests for flowers. If it’s not in stock right now, I may be able to order it or provide comparable flowers.

Budget: A good florist will be able to work within your constraints to create a stunning floral arrangement, even if flowers might be pricey.

Highlights of the Best Valentine’s Day Flowers That Aren’t Red Roses

Amaryllis (Hippeastrum)
Anemone (Anemone)
Mimosa (Acacia dealbata)
Hydrangea (Hydrangea)
Gerbera Daisy (Gerbera)
Tulip (Tulipa)
Hyacinth (Hyacinthus)
Ranunculus (Ranunculus)
Hellebore (Helleborus)
Orchid (Orchis)
Iris (Iris)
Icelandic Poppy (Papaver nudicaule)
Bonus: Designer’s Choice